How to Use HTML Tables to Optimize Your Factoidz Articles Part 1 of 3
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How to Use HTML Tables to Optimize Your Factoidz Articles Part 1 of 3

In a previous Factoidz article, we examined a few basic HTML codes which are potentially useful to any Factoidz writer. I strongly recommend that a writer who doesn't master HTML code read my more elementary article before going through this one. This Factoidz is an introductory article about how to create tables with HTML code. One must keep in mind that this is simply a practical reference, which by no means approaches HTML from a critical point of view; simply put, most people would probably agree that elements here work, even if some of them may present technical issues.

This Factoidz article is the first element of a three-part series on the creating HTML tables in order to better organise Factoidz articles. Below is a table of contents to allow readers to navigate between articles:

In a previous Factoidz article, we examined a few basic HTML codes which are potentially useful to any Factoidz writer. I strongly recommend that a writer who doesn't master HTML code read my more elementary article before going through this one. This Factoidz series is an introductory tutorial on how to create tables with HTML code. One must keep in mind that this is simply a practical reference, which by no means approaches HTML from a critical point of view; simply put, most people would probably agree that elements here work, even if some of them may present technical issues.Following is an example of a table:

Table A

Tables can be useful to organise one's Factoidz. Each one of these four boxes is is called a 'cell.'
Tables and the cells which constitute it can be customised. Hence, they can help users organise the layout of their Factoidz.

Tables they are a very useful tool once one understands how they work. I've published an article on Factoidz, entitled 'How to Interpret Road Signs in Europe,' which wouldn't have been possible without tables. However, due to their complexity and to the fact that they can be customised by the user, are relatively complex structures as far as HTML code is concerned. However, there are plenty of ways to tackle this problem.

Hence, we will proceed in three parts. In a first part, we will look at how on-line table generators can be used by Factoidz writers to enhance their articles. In a second part, which will be published soon, we will learn how to build HTML tables without the help of on-line table generators. In a third and final part, we will examine how the Factoidz writer's text box has features to help users further manipulate tables.

 

1. Using an on-line table generator

A simple way around this is for the writer to create a table with the help of an 'HTML table generator' and to past the code into the source code of his Factoidz article. Hence, one can easily experiment with the different variables without the risk of making any big code mistakes.

Let's go over these values of the table generator linked to above.

Table B (a 'table generator' table)

Element Description
Table Width This determines the width of a table. In an online table generator, it can usually be set according to pixel width or to the percentage of the width of the section one writes in.

Number of rows / Number of columns

Obvious to anyone familiar with HTML code, this sets the number of rows and columns. Table B has 8 rows and 2 columns.
Border width This sets the width of the frame of the table. Table B has its border width set to '2.' Setting border width to '0' makes the border invisible.
Background colour Often with the help of colour charts, one can choose the background colour of his table with dialogue element. The background colour of Table B is set to #FFCCFF, which corresponds to pink.
Cellspacing This sets the distance of one cell from another. In this very table (Table B), it is set to '0.' In the case of Table A, cellspacing is set to '12.' In Table C (see following Factoidz article) cellspacing is set to '3.'
Cellpadding This sets the distance between the cells and the text. Table B has cellpadding set to '12.' In the case of Table A, cellpadding is set to '3.' In Table C (see following Factoidz article), cellpadding is also set to '3.'
Border colour This simply sets the colour of the border. On this very table, the colour is #FFFF00, which corresponds to yellow.

Simply copy and past the entire text in the 'code' dialogue into the 'source' code of the Factoidz page (click here for a tutorial on how to access the source code). Once this is done, one can click on the 'source' button again to access the WYSIWYG mode anew. The table generator we are working with automatically provides placeholder text ("Table Cell"), which the user can then easily modify.

While one can get away with a lot of thing by using an on-line HTML table generator, such tools do have limitations which can only be surpassed by grasping how the internal architecture of HTML tables work.

To be continued...

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Thanks for sharing this information

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